FAQ's for  Grading

How is a note's grade determined?
What about numerical grading of paper money?
What about third-party currency grading?
 
 
How is a note's grade determined?
Assigning a term to describe condition, crispness, and wear for paper money is ultimately subjective, but is based on our over a dozen years experience as a dealer and over a quarter century as a collector. Grading standards can and do change over time. In general, the rarer the error, the less impact grade has on value. While most people tend to believe grade determines value, paradoxically in many respects it is value that determines grade, and helps explain why grading standards tend to "loosen" or "tighten" during strong market movements down or up.
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What about numerical grading of paper money?
There has been a push in recent years to add numerical grades, generally on a Sheldon-esque scale from 1 to 70, to paper money rather than or in addition to traditional adjectival grades, much like as has happened with U.S. coin grading since the mid-eighties. So far it has not yet gained widespread acceptance, however it seems likely that that will change in coming years, and bears watching.
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What about third-party currency grading?
This is a growing trend which has reached limited acceptance among collectors and dealers in paper money. Any note(s) we offer graded, authenticated, and or identified as to variety by a third-party represents the third-party's opinion and does not necessarily reflect Constellation Numismatic's opinion. Along with numerical grading, the popularity of this trend bears close scrutiny.
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